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Sustainable Development Goals: From an Investor to Property Developer

Updated 27/05/2019

Andrew Bodnar from Kingdom Developments is an experienced investor and developer who has been in the property game since he was 18. Interested from earlier than that join us in exploring Bodnar’s journey in and discover how he got interested in property at a young age and how he achieved his sustainable goals in development, the types of seminars and mentors he has which guided him to where he is now.

We’ll also be looking at how he was able to purchase his first property one month after turning eighteen years old, why he decided to get a mortgage broking license, and how he’s built a portfolio with renovated, developed or commercial properties. Following this we’ll also delve a little into the investing mistake he made and how to avoid it. So join us in this episode of Property Investory to find out all this about Andrew Bodnar and much more.

'I just realised the economies of scale when you leverage and you know come together with other people with the same vision together everyone achieves more.'

Andrew Bodnar

As a property developer, much of Bodnar’s job is based around getting investors into the property world...

My name's Andrew Bodnar I'm from Kingdom Developments and we do some investing property development for up and coming joint venture partners and for investors who want to get into the property market on a co-ownership. 

As a result, his day to day life heavily revolves around looking for sites and ensuring the developments he deals with all run smoothly… 

We look for property so we're probably acquisition sales and marketing and we go to council meetings and do development applications for co-ownership of large scale townhouse projects high rise projects and other different developments in the local community.  

Having to manage quite a lot in terms of property developments and the like, Bodnar explains how he’s able to juggle it all… 

I'm blessed with a very good team I've got a few very key business partners and some excellent architects and we've got a really good team around us of consultants and builders. So it's not just a one-man job it's all hands on deck to make it a profitable business and that's how we make it work.  

Growing up in Sydney, Bodnar delves a little into his story and what sparked his interest in property when he was younger… 

I grew up in western Sydney 10 minutes from Liverpool and we basically we started from I guess my story is the way I started was I'd do real estate and mortgage finance course at a high school and got into doing renovations. Initially just for smaller projects and I was doing those renovations also working in real estate at the same time and doing a mortgage working at night. So I was working two jobs so I could buy my first property as soon as I turned 18.  

With a natural interest in property and a talent for sourcing profitable properties, Bodnar explains how his journey into the property world propelled from here…  

I basically flipped and renovated a property between 2001 and 2007 and made about $30 to $50000 profit per renovation. And one of my clients was the builder at the time who are selling houses for it he said to me that a lot more profit in building you should be building bigger and I said I don't really know anything about building and renovation is sort of all I've ever done. And he said to me look you're good at finding properties you're good at negotiating and you've got a good eye for getting you know properties that are available you find them and I bought them for you and we'll do it 50/50. And so in 2009 I did my first joint venture duplex which was builder and then that became another duplex six months later and then from 2009 to 2014 we completed 16 duplex in and around the Western Sydney area. 

With this in mind however, Bodnar tells us about his schooling and education, explaining that prior to renovating, he did have another career path in mind…

I went to school at William Carey Christian School in Preston and studied legal study business studies and economics and then I went from that I got a scholarship in basketball game to America for a year and I studied over there and played basketball for one year realized that I wasn't tall enough or good enough to make it into the NBA and I thought I need to have a different goal with my adult life at 16. Wondering what to do with myself. I will have to go to a property seminar from a young age that my parents encouraged me to go to and how to do it properly, investing and share market trading, you know from a young age, which gave me a good footing and a foundation for my goals going into 18 out of high school.  

Talking about his basketball career, Bodnar explains how exactly he got into the sport… 

I was playing for a team in Sydney that traveled around the whole state training and different teams and we got invited to go to Ohio and Kentucky in America and Fagans nine different schools in and around those states. And one of those schools was Dayton Christian high school and they asked me to come back after playing against them and gave me a one-year scholarship to do high school over there. So that was my opportunity to sort of explore America and see what it was like you know living as an exchange student in another country and a great experience and I learned a lot out of it.  

And what kind of life lessons he gained from being given these opportunities at a young age… 

From independence from a young age, I was traveling 15 16 years old living with a new family in another country learning to adapt to different cultures and there was a great experience it gave me a lot of wisdom and knowledge in how to get socialized rush out all walks of life and all different cultures and. And for me, it was also a great blessing. And I was able to extend something like that at such a young age. Not many people get together and spend time together.  

Coming back to Australia later that year, it was after his arrival back home that Bodnar attended the seminar that sparked his passion for property…

I came back to Australia in June of 2000 and I got invited to a real estate seminar by Peter Stamm and it was for a seminar from 9a.m. to 9p.m. on flipping properties and trading on the stock market and my father was first to go. But he had worked on and my mum had two tickets. I went with her and that was my first sort of thing I guess learning about real estate other than playing Monopoly when I was a kid. It's always interesting to hear about that and all the really good learning experience. I realise why you don't just have to have a nine to five job and work for 40 years but you can actually make a lot of money out of investing. So learning that at a young age gave me a different perspective on career choices. And then I got me interested in other public speakers. So then I got interested in Anthony Robbins and Robert Kiyosaki or Warren Buffet and all the famous people that have come and gone and spoken about me investing in property and mindsets and all that sort of stuff. 

It was this epiphany of the lifestyle that property investing could give that essentially drove Bodnar to study real estate and begin saving for his first property… 

I was 17 when I did that course and I was one of the youngest people there about 3000 people at this seminar thought at Randwick Racecourse and basically I came out of it saying I want to do real estate like that just gave me a whole desire to have Puso and you know for and make a profit that way rather than being stuck in nine to five job so for me it made perfect sense. I came home from the seminar and I told my parents that I was going to be a real estate course and I immediately went and did a little flat course two months later and got my licence and got a job. Two weeks after completing the course and then I got a job working in Pizza delivery at night and doing mortgage broking as well so that way I could have three jobs to save up enough money to buy my first property. 

Juggling three jobs to save money and get into the property world as young as possible, Bodnar tells us how long it took him to save enough to buy his first property...

I was so motivated. As soon as I turned 18 and I was legally allowed to buy property I wanted to be able to buy one. So it took me about nine months to save up and I bought the property one month after I turned 18. 

Reminiscing on this first purchase he takes a moment to tell us about the life-changing moment…

I remember it to this day it was him herself and I was actually at auction. So very nervous my hand was shaking when I first went to buy the property and increasing my bid. 

I ended up buying it for two hundred and seventy-one thousand five hundred dollars. I still remember the price and it was a two-bedroom unit. One street from the station and I spent about thirty thousand dollars renovating it and sold out a few years later for 400000 and made me almost eighty thousand dollars clear after stamp duty and renovation cost. 

I was 19. It was only a year and a half after I bought it but I sold it. 

Definitely an exciting time in his journey, Bodnar shares that while starting his career as an investor he was also progressing in his career as a mortgage broker and real estate agent…

I  was working real estate. I gave up the pizza delivery job but I was also doing mortgage broking and real estate and that was my first property flicks and from there I did another seven off that a year.  

Working hard at a time most young adults find themselves interested in other activities, Bodnar explains that it was the potential lifestyle, that drove him to work multiple jobs at the time… 

I wasn't interested in doing a lot of the things that most people do at that age I didn't care about going clubbing or drinking or you know wasting my money on other things that I thought with the free time I had at night a mortgage broker that I was giving referrals to. He told me that he was making about two or three thousand dollars as a commission for an average home loan of half a million dollars. And he said to me you know if you refer to me I'll give you 500 dollars. And I thought to myself I get the license for done and do it myself I can make three thousand five hundred and I'll do the course myself it up being doubly qualified and had to. 

And that really definitely helps because it teaches the ins and outs of finance and also ins and outs of real estate too which. 

They both compliment each other really well. 

So for me it just made sense to do both. And you know I wasn't married at the time, I was still young so it made sense to work extra harder in those early years.  

Thinking back through his property investing journey so far, Bodnar reflects on whether or not his parents influenced his interest in property...

My parents biggest investment was me because they didn't invest in any property or really anything other than their own home but that they believed in me and they encouraged me. From a young age that I could do anything, I put my mind to it. So having them as a support and belief that you know whatever I wanted to do they were there to encourage me to do it. It just made it so much more easier to step out in faith and give it a go and with their encouragement and the fact that they felt that it was something that would help me as an adult sending me to those courses from a young age really gave me a good stepping stone. 

“I wasn't interested in doing a lot of the things that most people do at that age I didn't care about going clubbing or drinking”
-Andrew Bodnar

However while property was what his parents encouraged him to do, Bodnar shares why he decided to go beyond investing and get into share trading as well…

I learned from that seminar from a young age that property is more of an illiquid asset because you know you've got to sell the property before you get any real income because the rent that you receive normally only covers the interest rates so you don't really. You can't really live off the rent unless you finish paying off the house. So if you want to get some income on a regular basis share is provided by way of dividend or by buying and selling them like you can buy shares today and in three days you have your money back. If you decided to sell on so much more liquid and if you need the cash you can move them a lot quicker. So it was I guess all of the different asset classes that complemented real estate. So I had the cash flow from shares but then I had the long term that being real estate.  

Having tested the waters in both investing and shares, Bodnar explains that the experience has taught him a lot…

I didn't have much in shares when I first started I found out I'm under five or ten thousand dollars I think it was but most of my money was in it. But it was a good learning and understanding the market and seeing what you can't do and could and just really getting to know how the world works in terms of a market perspective gave me a really good fundamental background.  

And that this knowledge, together with his property know-how has allowed him to grow his portfolio...

Today I've completed 23 deals 16 of them being duplexes and townhouses and prior to that, I did seven flips of just renovating properties.  

Taking a moment to talk about his renovations, he talks about the process he undergoes when flipping properties… 

What I learned from the seminar when I was 18 was that you know you did good at what you're good at and try and do things that you're not good at. So for me you know I was good at designing picking colors organizing how I wanted it to look. But you know I wasn't a handyman, I wasn't good with a hammer and a nail or you know putting up or anything like that. So I outsourced all of that to contractors and you know carpenters and painters and basically just managed all those little pieces of the investment.  

With other investors often being unable to properly manage their tradespeople, Bodnar explains how exactly he pulled it off and how he ensured everything was done on time and within a budget… 

The thing is you don't rely on just one person to do the whole job. I got multiple quotes so you keeping people accountable and not just giving it to the first person that comes and tells you they can do your job. And the second thing as well is that I also told them that there was more work to come that I planned on doing this as a business and so they did the right thing by me and did it in a timely manner and performed well and kept in budget that there was more work to come and more deals that I was going to do so they could see that if they did the right thing that was going to be more work for them as well. So I think it’s just having a good incentive for the people that you and letting them know that you know you’re in it for the long haul and I think that is just how you manage people I guess and treating people the way you want to be treated. Just simple human elements.  

Despite being successful in managing all his properties, Bodnar shares there have definitely been some projects that haven’t been as smooth sailing…

From 2001 to 2007 I made you know probably half a million dollars almost out of flipping property and the one mistake I've made in real estate and now I'm 35 years old so I've been doing this now for 17 years was that I put a lot of money that I'd made out of renovating into buying a commercial property and this happened about six months before the Jessee in 2008 and I basically did a renovation to this commercial property. Got it lined up for the property and then that tenant couldn't pay the rent on time. They ended up moving out and I couldn't find a tenant for six months because of the GST and ended up selling that property for 150000 dollar loss and I guess in hindsight looking back at it the thing that you can learn from that is number one don't put all your money into one investment only. I put a lot into that commercial property nearly a million dollars. And then the second thing is you know if you're not happy with the rent that you're receiving you can drop the rent it's better to have some rent than no rent and also you know the best time to buy is when everyone else is fearful and the best hunter sellers and everyone is greedy. And for me I actually hold them when you know people were fearful about the GFC when I should have actually been keeping that property and riding it out. 

So I guess it's just looking long term and having patience. I think everyone regrets selling property everyone away. You know I wish I bought 10 properties back in 1980 and then people say I wish I was 10 properties in 1990 and I wish I bought 10 in 2000 everyone always regret not buying more. So I guess the biggest regret would be that I sold that. You know it's not a loss unless you realise the loss and so it goes. 

But what drove you to the fact to sell like do you think you could have held onto that particular property back then. 

Yeah I think I can if I was rather than trying to get enough rent to cover the interest I would have been better off to lower the rent and just you know work a second job or comic to cover the difference in the interest rather than selling the property at a 150000 dollar loss. 

I think that one mistake in real estate gave me a good footing going forward and I never did that again.  

Having had so much experience in the property field now, Bodnar talks about the moment he realised he could expand his property opportunities even more… 

When I got into building you know I was doing renovations for nearly 10 years and then had the opportunity to start doing development and duplexes and townhouses and now high rise units and I just realised the economies of scale when you leverage and you know come together with other people with the same vision together everyone achieves more. That's the definition of a team. And when you do it on your own there's only so much you can borrow or that the bank will lend you. When you do it together you're diversifying so you not put any of your eggs in one basket and you can also spread out and do a lot more property rather than just doing one transaction.  

Aside from learning the benefits of working in a team when it comes to investing, Bodnar has also learnt the importance of personal development…

I've always found a lot of time in self-development as well so I've attended more seminars since the first one. And you know like I said earlier on I went to Anthony Robbins and Robert Kiyosaki and other public speakers. John Maxwell who is a Christian speaker on leadership and just basically reading as much as I can and learning as much as I can. One of the keys you never know everything and you never know enough. There's always more to learn and I think just one of my habits has been to try and read at least the book for months and there's so much knowledge out there if you just put your mind to it. 

How To Tackle Big Developments with Andrew Bodnar

Delving into the details of his duplexes, Bodnar tells us how he met his builder and teamed up with him to complete over 16 builds…  

In 2009 I met the builder when he came into our real estate office looking for a real estate agent to sell his properties and we just clicked straight away and he gave me his business and we started selling his properties for him and then I asked him to teach me a bit about building and how it works and how much profit in the transaction. And he could see that I was hungry to learn and he gave me the foot in the door to start doing co-development and then I just took that in and ran it and then we just did it many as we could and I was able to complete 16 and five years. 

Great and was that mainly in the area that you currently still work you in or it across Sydney?

Yeah just all around the Western Sydney area which is for Liverpool, Campbeltown, Casulla, just to that sort of radius within sort of five or 10 kilometres of the major city.  

Still keeping in contact with this builder, Bodnar adds that since 2009, their goals have only become bigger, the duo tackling even larger scale developments...

Since doing those duplexes we then started going into bigger scale developments and now we're doing townhouses. We're doing apartments and hotels, army units and commercial development so we've we've grown a lot over the last 10 plus years. So we're not just doing duplexes anymore and that's just a stepping stone I guess to bigger and better things which is what we're doing now as a co-ownership scheme.  

He also explains how they knew they were ready to start completing projects larger than the usual duplex development and how he tackles other opportunities he is given...

Being a person of faith that I am I believe that God opens doors for you and opportunity come to those who seek them. I don't believe in luck. I believe that you know if you have an opportunity presented to you choose to take it or you don't. And for me I was blessed enough to have made a good connection when I was 18 at that seminar that I told you I first went to with a fund manager who ended up staying in contact with me for 15 plus years and eventually came out of Liverpool to see all the duplexes and all the renovations and all the projects that I completed and said Are you ready to do something bigger. And after knowing each other for 15 years and having a long term friendship and seeing me grow he decided to help us through our first high rise project and that became the next stepping stone. I guess it's not that you know that it's the right time but you know when tackling an opportunity given to you.  

Having been able to remain in contact with his building partner for so long, Bodnar tells us how he was able to maintain a good relationship with this partner despite barely knowing him when they got started.… 

He gave me this card when I first met him at the seminar and said oh you are the youngest person I've seen at a seminar like this. If you start now you've got a great head start and he basically became a mentor to me and we'd catch up once or twice a year for a coffee or get together in the city and he would tell me what he's up to in his business and I'd tell them what I'm up to with my renovation and then he came for my wedding and became a close friend and stayed in touch with me and we just catch up every year a couple of times a year and then after 10 years of watching you grow, he decided it was time to do something bigger and asked me if I was interested in. So I guess he just watched me from afar and with a mentor in those early days. 

Talking about the strategies he has in place when it comes to his projects, Bodnar shares with us the approach he takes in keeping properties… 

I guess most people you know when they hear negative news on the media and in the Internet they get to be fearful about what can happen in property. 

But the rental market itself is still quite strong and the interest rates are still relatively low compared to what they've been in the past. And so for me, I think it's a good time in this market rather than to be a seller of property to just be able to build those properties and hold them long term and have them as rental because you know most people biggest regret is that they sold at the wrong time or that they didn't hold on long enough. And I think that by keeping the property for rent and adapting to the market by doing you know hotels and service departments and doing mixed-use developments with commercial aspects I think that's a great way to adapt to this current climate.  

Discussing another one of his strategies at Kingdom Property, Bodnar elaborates on the strategy of co-ownership, specifically in regards to developments, and how exactly it works…

What we do is we believe that the best amount of profit is made when you buy the property. So you know buying at the right time and also buying the right way and finding a development that is got you know much more potential than what people may realize. And so once we find the security you know the property that we think is a good development and a key growth area. So a lot of our elements are around the new airport but we keep getting built and all the infrastructure from the government that coming into that area. So we're focusing on areas that have high job growth and high development from the government perspective. And then we'll then go to our friends and family and clients of ours. So we've looked through the 10 years that we've been doing you know real estate and mortgage finance and we'll say you know we found this property. Let's all go buy it together. So everyone puts in you know what they can afford to own the property and we go and secure that property developer together and then share the profits together.  

Having evaluated the potential gains from a property, Bodnar tells us why they to complete these projects and earn profits in a group rather than on their own… 

Well, first of all, you can only buy so much as most people would know. You know when you've got equity the bank loan lender you so much. And you know the standard job in Australia most people earn between 50 and 200000 per year. So there's only a very limited amount that you can borrow on your own but together when you come together and you've got multiple deposits combined incomes and you've got a strategy that allows you to add value to a property. It's a lot easier to get development financed than what it is actually sometimes to buy the single property on your own. 

How have you been able to structure something like this to enable people to be co-owners of these kinds of properties?

Yes all we do is set up a company for each individual property so the properties are not crossed collateralized or not joined to any of the other developments that each one has its own entity. And then we go and we negotiate to buy a property in that entity and will then divide the purchase price by 100 shares. So that says that project and then those people will then go and contribute to the positive that property and we'll share the cost of it. 

So pretty much the same for example those hundred shares could be multiple owners or you know one or two owners by 100 shares within that company but they all have very much invested interest in this into this particular deal. Do you need to also still go back to the bank to borrow anymore along these lines to purchase the rest of the property? 

Yes the usual purchase price of the land now and then we'll borrow the other half and then once we've done enough pre-sales or secured a long term lease something like that well then the construction costs from the lender. 

Okay so it's pretty much 100 percent on the development. 

50 percent on the land and 110 on the construction.  

Sharing more about Kingdom Developments he discusses the development projects he works on…

The actual company itself we started three years ago. Prior to that, we were just doing all the ownership in our individual names as borrowers. So the last sort of 15 plus years. 

We realized that once we started going quite economically we didn't make sense to have individual named surfactants is it better to have a company than to the individual borrower. So we decided to form Kingdom development as our trading name and it took off from there. 

And what project he’s working on at the moment...

Our biggest project is 262 units in Liverpool over 30 stories 100 million dollar projects. We've also got some smaller projects in and around Levington and Austral near the new airport Badgerys Creek and those projects are ranging from 30 to 50 million both and they're mainly townhouses and small high rise apartments. 

We've also got a couple of hotel project that we're doing in right and Gold Coast and they're between 20 and 30 million dollars. So most of our projects range anywhere from sort of 5 million up to 30 million that's sort of our sweet spot.  

“The richer you are the more you can give, and for me, my on my end game was the reason I do this is that I want to be one of the biggest givers in the world.”
-Andrew Bodnar

Dealing with such substantial developments and prices, Bodnar talks about how long these projects takes and how they plan and estimate the rate of development...

From the time we secure the property we normally negotiate a nine to 12-month settlement which gives us time to get the DA approval through trial and then that allows us to sort of organize what we're going to put on the land how we're going to design it and we're not you know we don't have to pay interest during that period because we've negotiated a longer settlement. 

So it's a great way to sort of save costs in the early days. It also gives us time to raise the money for our investment group so that we can. But investors know what we've secured and what we're going to do and it gives us time to raise the funds we need to buy the property and then from the period of settlement till the project is approved and built is usually on average per project somewhere between two to three years.  

Explaining what would happen if an investor was interested in these types of developments, Bodnar tells us the type of returns they can expect...

On average from now previous completed project we've completed. It's been quite a few collectors in town out there and the other ones we've done with average between 18 and 25 percent as a return. 

And how they’re able to offer these returns… 

I guess if you were to do a duplex on your own and you were to put a hundred thousand dollars of your own money and you were to sell the house and then make you know fifty thousand dollars per house you effectively have made you know nearly a hundred percent return on your investment. 

People don't look at it that way though that's a lot of times people look at what the actual gross cost is of a project rather than the actual net return on their cash. What they got to remember is that they're not actually making you know only 100000 dollars because they're actually getting a return on what they put in the bank lending either. So if you look at it through leveraging and look at it as a way of diversifying you can see that if you're putting a hundred thousand dollars into an investment and you're making you know 15 to 25 percent return it's actually quite achievable on a regular basis in real estate. But people just don't, in general, see the as being that simple. I think through all the media and all that and they see people make it very complicated but it's actually a really simple investment model. 

Whereas most investors need to purchase multiple properties to generate a passive income, investing in a development can help jumpstart a better return. He explains why...

Some of the advantages are you don't have to be a borrower. So you're not having to put up your own existing property or your name as security or collateral. So it frees you up in terms of sensibility. Secondly, you're not risking any more than what the actual cost of your investment is whether you're going to a project on your own you're responsible for the entire debt of it. So I guess by holding the property it lowers the risk from a co-ownership point of view. And also you've got a multiplexer strategy because you're not just in it on your own you've got other people that are involved to help you see the project their success.  

While there are instances where things can go wrong, Bodnar tells us how they manage to escape unfortunate scenarios… 

We've got multiple exit strategies per project that we're not just relying on one thing to happen though like we've got in some cases we sell the property once we've got approval and then you have to weigh that the building costs or the holding costs in other cases we build them go all the way and then sell and sometimes we also build and then hold. 

So I think having more than one exit strategy is the way to mitigate risk. You can never eliminate risk completely no matter what the investment is whether it's real estate or the stock market or anything and that's why we really take great pride in having the ability to be able to hold if we want to not have not be in a position where you're forced to sell.  

Delving into the mindset side of things, he shares with us that one of the biggest factors that drive him to create wealth through property is what it allows him to give back to others...

The why for me is what you can do when you have wealth. 

Because a lot of people have the goal of getting wealth but then what do you do once you obtain that wealth and people say you know when I have this much money I'm going to give this much to charity or when I have this much I'm going to do this with my life. So they're always living in the future rather than living in them now that they actually have a goal for the present and I think for me having that access to create wealth through property and shares and different investment vehicles it allows me to be a giver now rather than a giver in the future. I can do things for the community can do things for our church. I can do things for charitable organization and I can be in some ways like Warren Buffet and Bill Gates. My goal is to be able to give away 90 percent of my income and live off 10 and a lot of people think that rich people are actually greedy. But the thing is the richer you are the more you can give. And for me, my on my end game was the reason I do this is that I want to be one of the biggest givers in the world. That's my ultimate goal.  

Having such an inspirational plan, Bodnar shares with us the mentors he turned to in order to learn more about the property to start achieving his personal investing goals… 

My biggest mentor has been as an inspiration for me. His name is Samuel Hanrossie and we are co-invested in a growing charitable organization called humanity. And they actually up and coming in Australia as a non-profit organization that gives back to the local needs. 

And they did so well in their first few years of launch that they got a million dollars from Google. So Google believed in them so much that they backed them as well. So to be able to have my own business kind of inspiration in the giving community and all the things that we are supporting. 

It's been a real driving factor for me for about a year or so. 

In terms of books, Bodnar shares the three popular property classics that kickstarted his journey...

I guess my three favorite books would be Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill and the Richest Man in Babylon. I don't remember who the fruit of that one but I bought my three favorable stuff after the Bible.  

Having taught him so much in combination with his mentors and own experience, Bodnar ended up writing his own book....

Surely a lot of people when I do make it successful in life they say that they're self-made and I didn't like the title self-made. So I actually changed it to God made so my book is called God made me. And that's the story of my life. You know I guess my childhood up until now as an adult becoming a young entrepreneur and investor in Australia and what my parents taught me from a young age and combining my spiritual beliefs than my financial and health police into one. And it's a book about a half biography half a motivational encouraging people that they can do anything or whatever they put their mind to. They can prosper. 

Thinking about the rest of his property journey, he also tells us the most simple yet important piece of advice he’s heard throughout his investing days...

This advice is don't sell.  

With so much to do when it comes to property and an intense schedule that can often derail one from their original goals, Bodnar shares the personal habit he has...

I try and make a habit every morning to spend some quiet time. 

I start my day off with some reading and getting out in the sun and just basically just see. I guess you reset your mind every day and set your goals and just you know make sure that you know you're not getting distracted by the things of the world and that you are where you want to be and where you want to go and what you're focused on that every day. As for me, I'm very driven and I've got a lot of big goals. And I guess I want to be one of those top designers that make a difference in the world. I don't want to just come and go.  

Reflecting further back he shares the advice he would’ve given himself ten years ago… 

Don't sell a bigger investment in them and keep buying more of them hound them heralded. 

And the resident and tenant drove opportunities he’s most looking forward to executing in the near future…

I think just the versifying and multiple ethic classes not just being a residential development but also doing commercial and mixed-use and disability in nursing homes and aged care and childcare in hotels and just having a multiple asset classes I think is the best way to combat a moving market.  

Ever reflective of the goals and religious faith that have brought him to where he is now, Bodnar sums up whether or not he believes luck or skill, if any, have also played a hand in his success...

Zero-Sum luck. 

You 100 percent with some hard work and diligence and applying the Godbee principle that my parents raised me with and applying my faith that anything I put my mind to I could be good and then implying that then reading and studying and applying it to not just saying I'm going to buy a property one day but actually going and doing it. A lot of people say they're going to do something. How many people actually go and do something. I think being a doer and not just assayer is a big difference as well. And for me I don't believe in luck I believe in opportunity coming my way every single day. I believe that people get presented great opportunities and saying that it's luck but it is not true. If acting upon it when it's given to you. What makes you actually successful.  

So successful already and only looking to grow his portfolio to help others, even more, Andrew Bodnar is always ready to discuss property with any investor. Here’s how you can contact him:

Kingdom Development dot com dot au, the listeners they can check that out. First of all and have a look at what we're doing they can also call me direct. I'm happy to talk to people who love talking about what I love talking about being property and share so they can ring me on my mobile which is 0 4 2 5 3 4 0 5 3 4. Well I can also email me directly or indirectly Kingdom Development dot com dot au. 

This episode was produced by Sara Rahem with narrations and interviews conducted by Tyrone Shum.

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